Posts Tagged ‘home’

SHOP + REFLECT

mirrors for vanities and bathrooms 2016

This weekend I started making over one of our bathrooms at the new TBD HQ. I’m on the hunt for a good small to medium sized mirror and figured I should take you guys along with! We wanted to save some money on the bathrooms because we still have the main office to finish as well as the shooting studio and as you know, decor adds up QUICK AF. These are some of the mirrors we found and are considering, and they’re all under $100 which I cannot believe! I’ll add links for each one. (ALSO– I’m dead over this pink bathroom up top that I found the other day on pinterest. If anyone knows who’s photo this is, I’m dying to know and would love to credit.)

mirrors the beauty department

  1. ROUND BRASS MIRROR ($44.99)
  2. CASSIUS MIRROR ($130)
  3. PYRAMID MIRROR ($19-39)
  4. BRASS BEAUTY ($89)
  5. GAZE MIRROR WITH MARBLE STAND ($49.95)
  6. AVERLY CIRCLE MIRROR ($19-79)
  7. RIA MIRROR ($69-99)
  8. EDITH MIRROR SHELF ($79 + ONLINE ONLY)

Do you have a favorite? We’re currently leaning toward #4, #6 and #8 because you can set cute things like a tiny flower arrangement or mini travel product on the ledge.

 

MULTI MASKING 101

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

Most of us have combination skin. Our T-zone needs deep pore cleaning, our undereyes need instant oxygen and our cheeks need brightening or energizing! Or you chin could be chronically dry but your forehead is oily and tends to break out. There are endless combinations! Which is why multi-masking is so genius! Access your current skin situation (mine changes each season) and apply masks accordingly. Here’s how I broke it up for Rachel above:

T-ZONE:

Rachel’s T-Zone is naturally more oily than the rest of her face so the pores in that area get congested and clogged more easily.

CHEEK:

Like most of us, her cheek area has some dark spots and dry spots. So I switched to a multi-tasking mask that really energizes the area.

CHIN:

The chin is a very fickle area that needs its own separate assessment too! One day it becomes dry and scaly and lasts that way for a month, then it breaks out with dermatitis and little small bumps like a rash! So I took a moment to look and feel Rachel’s and determined it was a little on the oilier side, so I applied the same purifying mask that I used on her T-zone.

UNDEREYE:

The under-eye area is the thinnest and most fragile skin on your face so you have to treat it delicately. It’s also the tattle tale that shows the most signs of being tired (dark circles and bags). So I personally like using adding O2 to the area for an instant pick me up. Then I typically cover any uncovered areas with it as well.

You don’t have to do three different masks like I did… you can just do 2 or you can do 4! Just feel around with your fingers and determine which areas are dry, which are dull, which are oily and apply accordingly. I think you’ll be much happier with the results than just using one mask.

AT HOME FACIAL SERIES

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

We’re kicking off our At-Home Facial Series with my favorite secret for amping up a detoxifying mud mask and leaving your skin polished and glowing! I’ve been doing it for years and there’s nothing like it! So when you don’t have time or the room in your budget to visit your facialist, take your mud mask to another level by adding a product you probably already have in your bathroom cabinet. Here’s how:

TOOLS:

STEPS:

  1. Squeeze a generous amount of the mud mask onto your fingertips and rub them together.
  2. Apply all over face as demonstrated on Alyssa above. Wait 15 minutes or until it dries completely.
  3. Now don’t rinse yet! Squeeze a generous amount of the scrub onto your fingertips and rub together.
  4. Apply the scrub directly on top of the dried mask and start rubbing it in circles as you move across your facial area. This does two things: it breaks down the mask but more importantly, it helps remove dead skin cells while your pores are already cleaned.
  5. Now rinse by splashing with cool water. You can use a wet wash cloth or muslin cloth as well.

Your skin will feel incredibly soft and smooth like you just had microdermabrasion! If you have sensitive skin, test this process on a small area to make sure it’s not too irritating.

 

FLORAL WATER SPRAY

photos/post/design: Kristin Ess

What’s the best thing about Spring? Flowers, obviously! Especially the ones that can be bottled up and sprayed all over. Today were going to show you how to make your own floral water.

You will need: A large metal pot with glass dome lid, a ceramic ramekin, flowers, cutting board, knife, bottled water, turkey baster, ice.

  1. In the center of your large pot, place ceramic ramekin as your “catch bowl”. This is where the floral water will fall. Some people use bricks below their catch bowl but I’ve always thought that makes my water smell a little dirty. Instead I use a ceramic ramekin that can withstand higher heat. I’ve never had a problem with the ramekin getting too hot and “cooking” the fragrance. But if you want to put a brick under as a buffer, go for it!
  2. Pull the petals off of your flowers and give them a little chop. Not too much– I just do it to help release the fragrance.
  3. Pile the flowers around the ceramic ramekin as you see in photo 3. Add 1 1/2 cups of water for each cup of flowers. Note: Depending on where you live, I suggest using bottled water. If there’s any unwanted bacteria in your tap water, you certainly don’t want to bottle it up. Could get gross, fast!
  4. Place your glass lid upside down on the pot. Add a tray of ice on top. Without going into too much detail- the cold temperature of the ice will help procure condensation underneath the lid.
  5. Place it on the stovetop on low. I used a turkey baster to clear away the ice as it melted. Watch your flowers– once the color is gone from the petals, lift the lid. You should end up with a small amount of clear liquid inside  your ramekin.
  6. Use a turkey baster to transfer the floral water into a bottle. You may have to repeat the process to get an entire bottle full. Tighten the lid and spray away!!  

Here’s my hilarious little illustration of how the process works. Uh– don’t judge.

My favorite flowers to use:

  • Rose (particularly Sterling Silver if you can find them)
  • Jasmine
  • Chamomile (any tea for that matter)
  • Lemon Thyme
  • Lavender
  • Orange blossom
  • Honeysuckle
  • Champaka
  • Sage
  • Verbena
  • Coconut
  • Peony
  • Frangipani

Sadly I haven’t been able to make gardenias work for this yet, but luckily all of the ones above have worked really well.