VINTAGE CURL TUTORIAL

PHOTOS/POST/GRAPHIC DESIGN: KRISTIN ESS

A couple months ago I was asked to join 4 gorgeous + very talented ladies at a photoshoot for The Hollywood Reporter’s amazing new site, Pret-a-Reporter, which we love. I was terrified AND excited as I don’t usually sit in front of the camera! I’m more of a behind-the-scenes kind of gal. But when they told me about the concept I wanted to be a part of it. They asked each of us to channel an Old Hollywood Starlet and told us the headline of the article was going to be “Digital Starlets”. That was really exciting, but THEN the news got better. They told me that I got to channel Rita Hayworth. Melt. My. Heart. She’s always been my number one. The shoot was loads of fun and we’re beyond grateful that they included The Beauty Department in this story. You can view the images with all the other lovely ladies right here. I also thought it would be fun to do a tutorial on how I did my hair  for the shoot, so here we go!

  1. Shampoo + lightly condition. Don’t use a heavy conditioner or mask before attempting this hairstyle as it might weigh the curls down.
  2. Have you invested in a new mousse yet? It’s back and better than ever. There are lots of new mousses on the shelves that are soft and pliable, not crunchy.
  3. Work some through the root first and then down toward the ends. I gave it a nice brushing once the mousse was in to ensure even distribution. You DON’T want mousse clumps.
  4. Rough dry the hair using a flat brush. I have strong natural waves, borderlining on curly. You don’t need it to be smooth. In fact, I like mine to be a little puffy and frizzy because I feel like it holds the curl better in the long run. If you straighten it first it might fall flat quickly.

Try a section first so you understand how your hair will react to the curl. I did one here so you can see what the hair should do. Curl, cool, brush, bounce! That’s what you want.

  1. I start at the top and work my way down with the curling iron. I like to make sure the top and the middle get just as much heat as the ends so they don’t fall flat. I used a 5/8″ iron for this whole set. Seems small, but trust me you don’t want to use anything larger than 3/4″ for the curl or it will end up more like Veronica Lake Waves, which are great, but not the point.
  2. Let the curl cool until the hair feels cold. When you do your whole head, you’ll want to pin each curl and let it cool, but for this one I didn’t pin it.
  3. Brush out the curl until you see the pattern form.
  4. It should spring up and start to look like this. Once you get the hang of it, you’re ready to curl the whole head.

When I started to fall in love with vintage vibe hair, I started buying a lot of these old books with written tutorials. I tried to make you one below so you could see the pattern I used for this set.

  1. Create a side part on whichever side you prefer. This looks best with a side part rather than a middle part in my opinion. Curl the heaviest side first. Start at the top and pin the curls into place in the pattern above. Work your way to the bottom.
  2. The front pieces are the most important because they’re going to define the shape more than anything so be very precise with the front curls.
  3. Work your way around to the other side. You want to curl everything down and toward the face.
  4. Put your makeup on and get dressed while your curls cool. The colder the better.
  5. Now brush out the whole head. Keep brushing until you start to see the pattern form. Once you do, start adding hairspray. You can either tuck the hair behind your ear or you can twist it and pin it like I did using a large bobby pin. Totally up to you!

Pret-a-Reporter is also doing a sweepstakes which you should check out HERE!

Thank you to our friends at Pret-a-Reporter for partnering with us on this post and including us in the story!

AT HOME ROOT TOUCH UP

PHOTOS/POST/DESIGN: KRISTIN ESS

I’d like to handle this post with soft hands. Thursday I posted a teaser photo of this on Instagram. Got some heat right away. I’d like to avoid that here by saying up front– we’re not trying to put colorists (like myself) out of work, we’re not trying to get your clients to come in less frequently, and we’re certainly not encouraging people to start box dying their hair at home instead of going to a pro. In no way should any colorists feel threatened by this post. This is basic info that can be found on the internet already, not to mention most of it is inside of the box! This tutorial is not even 1/1000th of what a good colorist knows and it’s not going to give someone enough confidence to leave their stylist to start doing it at home. Please be open minded to the fact that some people cannot make it into a salon for many reasons– budget constraints, distance, their colorist cancels last minute before an important date and they can’t get in anywhere else, etc. In addition, I personally have a very soft spot for at-home box dye experimenting because my first box of “Cinnamon Stick” by Natural Instincts in the 90′s is what made me want to become a colorist in the first place. Experimenting and gaining knowledge is part of life, ladies and g’s.

That being said, let’s do it…

 

  1. Detangle your hair with a detangling brush.
  2. Drape yourself with a cape or an old towel around your neck.
  3. Determine where your regrowth (your roots) stops.
  4. Use a tail comb to accurately create 4 sections. When coloring your hair, it’s important to work in clean sections to avoid patches/missed spots.
  5. Your four sections should look like this.

 

  1. If you’re someone who does their own root color regularly, it’s a good idea to invest in a tint brush, color bowl and a small wire whisk. If you prefer to use the bottle from the box, you can definitely do that, but I feel like the brush/bowl method helps with accuracy.
  2. Use a wire whisk to mix your color & developer together until you see zero “chunks”. Or you can shake it up in the bottle and pour the contents into the bowl.
  3. This is a tint brush. You can pick one up at most beauty supplies. This one has rounded edges, which I prefer, but you don’t have to get that.
  4. Put protective gloves on before you start applying color.

*if your skin stains easily or if you’re using a dark/rich color, put a thin application of Vaseline around your hairline and on the tops of your ears to create a barrier.

NOW… this is where opinions will vary. From here on, this is my personal opinion which you can follow or not. This is how I like to color my own hair when I’m in a pinch or can’t find time to get it done by one of my pro friends. If you like to start at the bottom or do anything differently, by all means, go for it! The reason I like to start on top is because I want the color to look most perfect on top and in the front where it’s the most visible. Sometimes when you start on the bottom, the color gets less powerful (aka: oxidizes) by the time you get to the top. If the color is slightly less powerful by the time I get to the bottom, I’m okay with that, but not the other way around. I also find it easier to keep my sections organized when I start in front.

Warning: This application is NOT the same for bleach and in my opinion you should never try to bleach your hair at home. That’s next level and you should always leave that to a professional, no matter what.

 

  1. Apply a layer of color at the top center part.
  2. Using the tail of your tint brush, take a 1/4″ section and flip it up and over to the other side.
  3. Your sections should look like this. You should be able to see color through the other side. If you can’t see color through the section, it might be too big and you should take a smaller section to insure accuracy.
  4. When you paint each section, brush the color upward  when going above the part and then paint downward below the parting. This will help you make sure you don’t miss any spots.
  5. If you’re not quite sure that you go it all the way through, you can very lightly comb through to be sure. But again, you could just take smaller sections if you think you missed a spot.
  6. Once you finish the top/front sections, clip them together so they don’t get mixed into the back sections. Don’t clip where there’s color. Don’t twist the hair either. Just gather it all and gently place the clip below the color.
  7. The back sections can be tricky. I like to start at the top and do diagonal sections laying them forward as I go. If you look at photos 7 & 8 you’ll see the direction in which I work. Start at the top and work your way to the bottom.
  8. Check in the mirror behind you and make sure you get your hairline at the neck accurately. Nothing worse than putting your hair in a ponytail and having missed a spot.
  9. Go around the front hairline once more (especially if you have stubborn grays). Clean up your hairline so you don’t get a giant mark across your forehead.

 

I am obsessed with glosses. I put one on every client who gets a base color because I feel like it’s just not the same without a gloss. You may remember THIS POST about glazes, which you is the at-home version of a gloss. You can’t buy the type of glosses we use at the salon to use at home so if you’re looking for that kind of shine, book an appointment with your colorist. Otherwise you can glaze it up like this:

  1. After your hair color processes for the time suggested by the manufacturer it will stop. At that point,  you can clip up the top half of your hair. Don’t push it into the color on top of your head. Just set it up there lightly and clip.
  2. Apply glaze liberally until you get to the top. Let it sit for the suggested time, then rinse everything all together.

Optional: If you’re planning on pulling color through your ends instead of  doing a glaze, follow the timing instructions on the box. Every brand is different. This tutorial is specifically for touching up regrowth + glaze, not for doing a solid over-all color– you need a pro for that.

PACKING PRODUCT FOR TRAVEL

PHOTOS/POST/GRAPHIC DESIGN: KRISTIN ESS

To some of you super smarties out there, this may be a really obvious travel tip, but the  first time I learned this trick I was like “whaaaat?”. (Yah, that’s how I talk.) I used to resort to just throwing my bottles of shampoo + conditioner in a gallon ziplock and then into my suitcase. Constantly bummed when I got to my destination to see that ziplock full of shampoo. The lid would pop open almost every time, I assume due to altitude pressure. And if you’re a hair colorist, like me, traveling with color it can be extra sad. Once I tried this method of packing product for travel, I never had that issue again. Thought it would be a nice trick to share with you so here’s how it’s done…

  • Use basic kitchen cling wrap. You can also cut up an old plastic grocery bag, a shower cap, a ziplock, anything plastic that you want to get another use out of.
  • Cut it up into 3 or 4 inch squares.
  • Take the lid off the product and lay the plastic on.
  • Secure the lid back on.

Voila! If you’re doing it on a product with a pump or spout, you will need to have the lid on top as well to keep the pump from pressing down and causing leakage. Regardless, adding the plastic sheet will still help to stop any liquid from coming out where the lid gets screwed on.

ROUND BRUSH WAVES

PHOTOS/POST/GRAPHIC DESIGN: KRISTIN ESS

Hope you all had a lovely Valentine’s Day! Thought this would be a great tutorial for you to try out over the weekend. Everyone loves a good blowdry, right? Well, this is a trick you can use on any length hair from a chin length bob to super long, and whether it’s thick or thin. It’s a great way to show layers and a nice way to get some wave without using an iron. Here we go!

  1. Shampoo + condition in the shower, then detangle your hair as usual. Here you see we’re using my favorite Conair detangling brush.
  2. Add your styling product of choice. I encourage a light mousse or something that will give a soft hold. Doing this blowout with no product may not be quite as effective. Here we used this mousse from Oribe. The reason I like this one so much is because gives such great hold but feels like there’s nothing in the hair. It’s expensive but so worth the investment. If you want a soft mousse that’s more reasonably priced, try this one from Dove.
  3. Now we grab the blowdryer and round brush. Blow out a section as usual. I like to start in front and move to the back but you can do it the other way around if you prefer.
  4. Once the section is dry, keep the ends wrapped around the brush and twist outward. Twist until the hair is wound tight but not until it coils.
  5. Now release the hair and it will un-spin a little.
  6. Blow out the next section. I chose the bang area to do next because I like to do the sections that dry fastest first.
  7. Again, once the section is dry, twist, twist, twist, then release.
  8. Leave your sections twisted like this until you finish the whole head.
  9. The back can always be a little challenging, but once you get a section dry, pull it to the side when you twist it, not upward. (see photo)
  10. Once you’ve finished blowdrying, the sections are ready to be broken up. Lightly shake your head and then gently pull the sections apart using your fingers. Use a fine mist hairspray at the end for extra UMPH! Our faves are this unscented goodness from L’Oreal and this beautifully scented one from Oribe.

Let us know if you try blowdrying with a twist! We love to hear about your experience in the comments below or take a photo and tag us @thebeautydept on instagram! Have a wonderful weekend, pretty people!