Posts Tagged ‘kristin ess hair color’

COLOR TALK: DEPTH

photos/post: Kristin Ess

photos/post: Kristin Ess

We don’t usually go into heavy detail about hair color around here because TBD isn’t a website geared toward industry pros (although I know some of you are, hey hunnies!!), but lately I’ve had a lot of people asking me about how to get more natural looking depth, contrast, color variation, whatever you personally like to call it. You sometimes will lose natural looking contrast over time, depending on the way your colorist does highlights. Adding some lowlights in between your highlights is one way to go but occasionally I see a new client and I just need to “start over”. I do that in 3 steps: coloring most of the hair back to it’s natural color, doing a fresh highlight, and then toning. If you feel like you’ve just lost that natural look and your hair is starting to look too solid for your liking, ask your colorist if you’d be a good candidate for this!

Who’s a candidate for this process?

  • someone who is a new client that comes in with wayyyy too many colors and tones from various processes.
  • someone who has been getting a base color + highlights (double process) who wants to return to a more natural look.
  • someone who has been in for repeated highlight appointments but never lowlights, losing contrast/color variation through the ends over time.
  • someone wanting a complete change of color, something that looks more natural.
  • someone who does not have overprocessed, weakened or broken hair.

The process:

  • I evaluate my clients hair. Emily (above) had a very heavy root growing in when I met her. She had multiple rounds of balayage in a short period of time.
  • I put some of her blondest and any weakened/delicate pieces into foils with a conditioner so I didn’t have to re-lift those. Those were mostly in front.
  • I colored the rest of her hair back to her natural color.
  • I blowdried that and then did my normal highlight over that adding Olaplex to my formula for additional insurance that she wouldn’t get any breakage.
  • I toned the hair to give it some glossy shine and to remove any unwanted warmth.

Things you should/shouldn’t do:

  • DO Make a consultation appointment with your hairstylist. Talk it over and look through photos together.
  • DO Ask them if going back to something close to your natural color and then re-highlighting would be okay for you. You want to make sure your hair is in good enough condition to handle the process. (Luckily with the advancements in color + Olaplex, this process isn’t necessarily hard on your hair the way it used to be, but still get the advice of a pro.)
  • DO Book and plan accordingly. If you’re going to do this process, just know it will take a little extra time. Make sure both you and your hairstylist have enough time to do it!
  • DON’T try this at home. I know there are some people who do a base color or even a mini highlight at home. This is not something I would suggest. It’s complicated and there are too many risks involved in doing this yourself. Leave this one to a pro.

Here is Emily’s hair curled and in the sunshine. If you want to know about these gorgeous waves, you can find the tutorial right HERE!

best beach waves ever the beauty dept

HAIR COLOR GUIDE (ASHY)

post/graphic design: Kristin Ess

For my next several hair posts, I’m going to be posting on color tones. In fact, I feel like we have a lot to talk about with color in general. A lot of you have asked in emails and comments if I could help you get a better understanding of color tones, so we’re going to do just that. We’ll start with ashy tones, then we’ll go into neutrals, warm neutrals, golds, warm golds, subtle hints of red, and then all red tones.

ASHE TONES: First thing I want to tell you is that tone has nothing to do with lightness or darkness. Look at the grid of photos above. Do you see what they all have in common? It’s the smoky-looking silver-y sort of color. That’s what tone is. Doesn’t matter if the hair is super light or super dark because it’s just about the hue that the hair gives off. Here are a couple of things to keep in mind if you ever want to try ashe tones:

  • Who can wear it? The girl who’s skin is completely clean and clear! Any hints of redness from acne or rosacea will clash with ashy tones. If you have redness but you cover it well, you can still wear an ashy tone. Just know that when you wash your makeup off it may not be your favorite look. (Sorry, that’s real talk.)
  • Wait, ashy?? On purpose?? You’re probably wondering why anyone would want their hair to look smoky or muddy… some people hate it, some people love it. It’s just a personal preference. If you have the right skin tone, style your hair well and don’t let it look like a rat’s nest, ashy hair can be really beautiful.
  • Talk to a pro. Seriously– putting a warm glaze over your hair at home is one thing, but making an ashy tone look nice requires some mad skills that only a great colorist will have.
  • What can you wear with ashe toned hair? Monocromatic looks are my favorite with ashy hair. Try wearing all different shades of grey.
  • Makeup must: a pop of color on the lip. Icy hair color paired with a bright matte pink or orange lipstick can be stunnnnnnning. And it will keep you from looking too drab.
  • Be polished. With ashy hair you’ll want to put a little effort into your hair, styling-wise. If you have beautiful air-dried waves, that’s great, but if you don’t make sure to put a little effort into your hair. Ashy can tend to look dull so you have to OWN it! Become best friends with your curling iron.
  • Maintenance: Purple shampoo and a deep conditioner. Purple shampoo will help you maintain those silvery tones. And you must deep condition at least once a week to retain some shine on ashy hair.

Up next… Neutrals (it’s more exciting than it sounds!) xo