Posts Tagged ‘how to’

HOLIDAY SPARKLE

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

I know that most of you will step it up at holiday parties this year by rocking a red lip! But today I’m tempting you to take it a step further and pair it with a simple sparkle eye. Nothing Vegas Showgirl or anything distracting. Just one glitter liquid liner and four ways to rock it. Here’s how:

TOOLS:

TBDGlitter1InnerTwinkle

INNER TWINKLE

  1. Look up and start in the inner corner. Trace the liquid liner about 1/3 of the distance across the lower lash line. You can decide how thick or thin you want it. I always end up making it a tad too thick but always notice right away and in time to swipe away the unwanted width with a q-tip (or my finger) before it dries.
  2. Follow with a couple coats of mascara.

TBDGlitter2GoldLine

THE GOLD LINE

  1. One of my very special clients did this on her own for her baby shower this year and everyone loved it! Simply start at the inner corner of your upper lashline and trace the liner across to the outer corner.
  2. Go back over it to add another coat of glitter. If that’s enough for you, stop there, or you can do a third coat on top to add even more glitter, which is what I did on Neelo here.
  3. Finish with a couple coats of mascara.

TBDGlitter3LidSparkle

LID SPARKLE

  1. Here you are just adding lines above the gold line that you drew in The Gold Line until you’ve filled in the entire lid. Stop before the crease so it doesn’t crease.
  2. Go back over the lid a couple more times until you’ve reached the amount of desired glitter.
  3. Finish with a couple coats of mascara.

TBDGlitter4Ombre2

OMBRE

  1. This time, do the steps from The Gold Line, but instead of filling in the entire lid like we did in Lid Sparkle, this time only draw the Gold Line.
  2. Before it dries, aka immediately, place your finger over the line and gently smear the glitter upward.
  3. Pick your finger up and press it repeatedly all over your lid.
  4. With the remaining few specks of glitter left on your finger, press it along the crease.
  5. Go back and draw a line at the upper lash line again to make sure that’s the most intense area.

 

DRAW, SMUDGE & SMEAR!

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

When shadow sticks came along a few years ago, the makeup industry was changed forever! They put the intensity of a cream shadow into a rounded stick that glides with ease. Then they formulated them to be smudgeable for a minute then set and last for hours without fading. Like all makeup, you can apply them however you prefer. I’ve found that if you want to make sure it doesn’t crease in the crease, this is the way to apply it. And the trick is not to apply it into the crease. Instead, only apply it on the lid, then smear and smudge it with your finger into the crease creating a slow fade. Here’s how:

TBDShadowSticks101TOOLS

OUR FAVORITES:

TBDShadowSticks101DIAGRAM

STEPS:

  1. Directly from the tube, draw across the entire lid as demonstrated on Lacy below. Leave the crease bare.
  2. Place your finger on top of what you just drew and start to smudge it upward into the crease.
  3. Now that you’ve smudged it into the crease, start to “drag” or pull it towards the outside corner of the crease. See the diagram below.
  4. Apply a couple coats of mascara and you’re good to go!

TBDShadowSticks101STEPS

If you prefer brushes over your fingers, you can absolutely use one to blend the shadow up in step 2 and over step 3, but with your finger, you have the advantage of your body temperature to help move the product around better. You can also apply it to the bottom lashline if you wish. Just trace along it with the stick then smear it gently with your finger or a Q-tip.

TBDShadowSticks101FINAL

 

HAIR TALK: THE LOB

PHOTOS/POST: KRISTIN ESS

PHOTOS/POST: KRISTIN ESS

Perhaps you’ve noticed the lob and the bob are taking the world, or at least our social media feeds, by storm. It’s a really fun time to make a big hair change and you want to make sure it’s done right. Today we’re talking all things lob and later this week we’ll cover the bob. I thought it would be fun to go into detail about these cuts here because it’s hard to answer all your questions on Instagram and Twitter. Here are the questions I get the most about lobs, specifically, and my best answers for each. If there is a general question that could be good for the group that you don’t think I covered, add it to the comment section below and I will add it in an update within the week!

  • Can I wear a lob? Almost anyone can wear a lob and your hairstylist will let you know if you shouldn’t. It actually has nothing to do with face shape. I have cut this on pretty much every face shape out there. I would say the only people I would avoid cutting a lob on would be people with extremely thick or thin hair. Not just regular thick or thin, we’re talking a mega mane or baby, baby, BABY fine hair. Cutting this on extremely thick hair could take so much work and thinning out to make it look similar to this that it may be really hard to style on your own and it simply may not ever look like this after leaving the salon. If you have incredibly thick hair, it’s better to stay a little longer with your length and then get this kind of texture! If you’re the girl with super-duper baby fine hair, try a bob instead. Something that falls between your chin and your shoulders. Super fine thin hair at this length can look stringy when texturized like this, even if the bottom is cut blunt and texture is added to the top layer. A few hours into your day, the hair might separate and just look weak.
  • How do I make sure my hairstylist understands what I want? Bring photos. Bring this photo. Gone are the days of ego-driven maniac hairstylist who take offense to pictures. We live in a Pinterest-reference world, do we not? Make a small folder of images to show your hairstylist and let them piece it together. I look at my client’s collection of photos and can gather what they like and dislike through one short convo about image.
  • What do I ask for specifically? For this particular cut, you would say “I would love a collar-bone length lob with texture though out. A tiiiiiiny bit shorter in the back than in the front.”
  • Can I have a lob with my texture? Yes. Your hairstylist will know what is best suited for your personal texture. But rest assured, this length looks great on the straightest hair, waviest hair and the curliest hair.
  • What styling tools do I need? I don’t let my clients leave without either THIS or THIS. The first one is definitely and investment but gives you that “flat iron wave” look without having to perfect the flat iron wave technique. The second one is a very affordable alternative and a personal favorite of mine.
  • What products do I need? Product-wise I always recommend THIS or THIS mousse paired with THIS or THIS pomade. There are plenty of great alternatives to both but you should start off with mousse on wet hair and finish with some sort of great, lightweight, water based pomade.
  • How often do I need to get it cut? Lobs are different than a bob because a bob can grow for a while and turn into a lob, whereas the lob can start to flip out at the bottom in an undesirable way as it grows out, so you’ll need to keep it as close to collar bone length as possible. I would say 6 weeks is good on average.
  • Can I do it with bangs? You certainly can, you just want to make sure it doesn’t start to look like a wig (unless that’s your jam). Hair covering the forehead and falling on the sides of your face can overwhelm and hide your gorgeous mug and nobody wants that. Keep the bangs lights and sideswept if possible. Make sure they go well with the texture of this cut.

the beauty department lob

 

Again, if there’s a question you think I didn’t cover, let me know below and I do an update! Good luck if you decide to make a big change, pretty peeps!

CROW’S FEET 911

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

 

It happens one morning: you get up, wander into the bathroom, lean in to see the mirror more closely and there they are… crow’s feet! You swear they weren’t there yesterday?! You’ve read about them, seen them on your mom, but didn’t think they could happen to you this young! Then it hits you: they’re only going to get worse! So you vow to amp up your anti-aging routine from this day forward. And we’ll help guide you through with our new Anti-Aging Series, starting with this today’s tutorial that takes skincare to the next level.

LED (Light Emitting Diodes) Therapies have been warriors against wrinkles for over a decade now because unlike other devices and gadgets that are complete nonsense, these actually have proven results. Blue lights are used to prevent and clear up acne while red lights work on the appearance of lines and wrinkles (as well as pain therapy) and even dark spots by accelerating cellular metabolism, repairing damaged skin cells and stimulating the production of structural proteins .  But you had to make a trip to the spa every week consistently to enjoy and see the results. So you can imagine how excited I was a few years ago when brands made ones to use at home! I’ve sifted through the numerous ones out there to find these three favorites that are professional strength and really work. Spend 10 minutes in front of the TV doing this a couple times a week and watch friends out of nowhere compliment you on your skin. I kinda got addicted after that kind of feedback! Here’s how:

OUR FAVORITES:

STEPS:

  1. After washing your face, place the device directly on a problem area and turn it on.
  2. Hold it over that area (you can actually touch the skin with it) for 1-2 minutes.
  3. Move it to another area and hold it there for 1-2 minutes. Repeat until you’ve covered every area of concern. I do under my eyes, the outer sides of my eyes, my forehead, in between my eyebrows, my lips and each lower cheek.

Note: You can do this on clean, bare skin or apply your favorite serum first like my facialist does. The red lights will make the serum permeate the surface better and work more. But don’t use this device with a Vitamin A serum as the lights will actually prevent it from working.