Posts Tagged ‘contouring’

MOST IMPORTANT CONTOURING RULE

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

People always ask me what the most important contouring rule is and it’s most definitely this one. Contouring has to be done with a matte formula. Not a shimmering bronzing powder. Why? Because you’re sculpting your face like an artist, using dimension laws to help make things look further away or closer. When you want to sculpt your cheeks for example, you want to create the illusion of a hollow by shadowing it darker, so it looks more inward. Same applies to the crease on your eyelid. If you want your face to look thinner and less wide, you shade the whole perimeter darker. Any time you add shimmer, you are drawing light to that area, which is exactly what you don’t want to do!

TOOLS:

You can do all of the above with cream formulas as well, it’s really a preference thing. But if you set it with powder after, make sure it’s a matte powder and not a shimmering one. Once you’ve sculpted your face, you can go back and add all the shimmer you want to the remaining areas. I like to add shimmer shadow to the lids (just under the crease) and above the cheekbone.

STROBING 101

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

You might have noticed that the beauty world has become obsessed with Strobing! It’s hot right now, even though it’s actually been around for ages. Basically strobing is just highlighting areas that you want the light to hit and reflect off of, bringing those features forward and stealing all of the attention. Typically we pair highlighting with contouring (revisit my Highlight & Contour Tutorial for more) but it’s quite beautiful on its own. Especially in the Summer months when we let our skin glow and come alive. So let’s take a moment to walk through how I like to do it!

TOOLS:

STEPS:

TBDStrobing101STEPS

Using your finger with a cream/fluid or directly from the stick, swipe it:

  1. just along the top of your cheekbones,
  2. above your browbones (the brow frames the eye, so it’s a great place to draw attention to),
  3. down the center of the nose in a straight line (this just reinforces that your nose isn’t flat and protrudes away from your face like your cheekbones and browbones do),
  4. just above your cupid’s bow (this adds dimension to make your upper lip look like it is slightly fuller and protrudes more),
  5. just below your bottom lip (your bringing the area that is receding in between your bottom lip and your chin forward).

TBDStrobing101STEPS2

Then blend and buff it in with the brush or the sponge! And tag us on Instagram or comment below with your favorite strobing products!

QUICK TIP: CONTOURING

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

Over the last few years, contouring has become mainstream after decades of being a secret weapon that makeup artists learned in school to add dimensions back to the face after creating a blank canvas with foundation. I’m not gonna lie, it has gotten a little extreme for my taste but if you’re reading this here, your taste is a little more natural like mine. Anyway, today we’re sharing a contouring must that a lot of people don’t know about! When you sculpt your cheeks, it’s prettiest if you don’t bring the contour shading too far in. Why not? Because it ages you in a very unflattering way. We want to hollow out our cheeks but we need the suppleness of the apples to look healthy and young! And the easiest way to achieve this is to imagine a line from the end of your brow straight down your cheek then simply don’t cross it. Some makeup artists place the line at the arch of the brow, but my mentor and idol Mary Greenwell taught me one afternoon in Madrid never  to bring it in that far, and I agree. And you don’t have to hold the brush up every time! Quickly you’ll be able to eye it. Here’s how:

TOOLS:

  • Your Favorite Contour Cream — I was so excited when this cream palette came out and it’s $40 off right now!
  • or Your Favorite Contour Powder — This iconic contour & highlighting palette has everything you’ll ever need in shades that work gorgeously on most skin tones; while this duo works well with your budget!
  • A Flat-Headed Contour Brush — I love this dual-ended slenderizer brush that really presses the product into the skin.
  • A Densely-Packed Blush Brush — the wavy soft fibers of this brush makes it like nothing you’ve ever used before. The best!

STEPS:

  1. Hold a brush or a pen/pencil perpendicularly straight down from the end of your brow as demonstrated with Lacy above. Make a mental note where it crosses your cheek area. If you need more than a mental image, you can use your non-dominant hand to hold the brush in place while you use your dominant hand to contour, but it doesn’t have to be exact or anything, so just eye it and you’re good.
  2. Now that you know how far to bring it, follow the hollow of your cheek (just under the cheekbone) inward and stop where the imaginary line is.
  3. Go back in the other direction and bring it all the way to the ear area so there isn’t a blank space there.
  4. Switch to the unused brush and blend it in by gently swirling over it until it’s half the intensity it was originally.

TBDImaginaryContourLineFINAL

BLUSH + CONTOUR CHEAT SHEET

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

There are two great reasons why you should take a second and try this technique to find your cheekbones! First, it shows you where the bone is so you know where to sweep the contour (directly underneath to “support” the bone and create a hollow) and where to swirl the blush (directly on top). And second, it shows you the angle of your cheekbone so you know the direction to apply it. Good stuff! Here’s how:

TOOLS:

STEPS:

  1.  Grab the pencil and place it along your cheek. Roll it up and down with your fingers flattened until you feel where the cheekbone is. Turn the pencil until it is exactly the same angle as the bone then roll it just below the bone so it’s touching it but just under it. That’s the “hollow” of your cheek and where your contour should go. The blush goes directly along the cheekbone (either only on your apple or along the cheekbone itself; I’ll post a comparison study of the two next week!). Take a mental photograph of the pencil’s placement and angle. Suck in your cheeks if that helps you see it as well. Press your thumb along the bone to really feel it too. My cheekbones (and most of my clients’) came in at 26. Until then, these techniques will help you find them.
  2. Follow the hollow by sweeping the contour cream or powder just underneath the cheekbone along the angle that you discovered with the pencil. as demonstrated by Chloe above. I always swirl the brush on the back of my hand after dipping it in the product to thin and even it out before I ever let it go near my face because nothing’s worse than a muddy contour!
  3. Switch to the blush brush and dip it in the blush. If it’s a cream blush, swirl it on the back of your hand, if it’s a powder blush, give it a couple taps against the counter to get rid of any excess. Swirl and stamp the brush along the cheekbone, just above the contour.