Posts Tagged ‘at home’

AT HOME FACIAL SERIES

TUTORIAL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY NADINE, GRAPHIC DESIGN BY EUNICE CHUN

We’re kicking off our At-Home Facial Series with my favorite secret for amping up a detoxifying mud mask and leaving your skin polished and glowing! I’ve been doing it for years and there’s nothing like it! So when you don’t have time or the room in your budget to visit your facialist, take your mud mask to another level by adding a product you probably already have in your bathroom cabinet. Here’s how:

TOOLS:

STEPS:

  1. Squeeze a generous amount of the mud mask onto your fingertips and rub them together.
  2. Apply all over face as demonstrated on Alyssa above. Wait 15 minutes or until it dries completely.
  3. Now don’t rinse yet! Squeeze a generous amount of the scrub onto your fingertips and rub together.
  4. Apply the scrub directly on top of the dried mask and start rubbing it in circles as you move across your facial area. This does two things: it breaks down the mask but more importantly, it helps remove dead skin cells while your pores are already cleaned.
  5. Now rinse by splashing with cool water. You can use a wet wash cloth or muslin cloth as well.

Your skin will feel incredibly soft and smooth like you just had microdermabrasion! If you have sensitive skin, test this process on a small area to make sure it’s not too irritating.

 

AT-HOME HAIR GLAZING

POST/PHOTOS: KRISTIN ESS

Glazing your hair is really important, particularly if you tend to go an extra long time between cuts or colors. Hair gets dull and luckily there is an at-home solution to lackluster locks– glazing. Think of it like a topcoat for your nails, but instead it’s for your hair. Glosses and glazes help seal the cuticle down and increase shine, big time. I put a color glaze on every single client after I do their hair because it seals in all the hard work we’ve done. Luckily, many companies have started making glazes that you can buy and do on your own at home without having a pro license. 10 years ago I would have said it was a bad idea to do this at home without the supervision of a pro, but the new glosses are completely user friendly. You can see the difference in Katie’s hair below. We used a gloss that had a golden tone to it. It warmed up her hair and left it super shiny.

For this tutorial we used Redken Shades EQ Crystal Clear + Shades EQ Processing Solution. Admittedly, the bottles are kind of expensive, but you’ll get many uses out of each one. For Katie’s hair we used 2 ounces of the Crystal Clear and 2 ounces of the Processing Solution. If you have the same amount of hair, you would get 8 treatments out of both bottles combined.

A more accessible and user friendly at home glaze is John Frieda color glaze. ($10) available in several shades. (For this one you shampoo and conditioner first as opposed to the one we applied to dry hair.)

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POST-BLOWOUT FRIZZ FIGHTER

photos/post/design: Kristin Ess

One of the worst things I can think of is blowing out your entire head of hair only to find it getting puffy + frizzy by the time you’ve put your makeup on and gotten dressed. Obviously the curling iron or flat iron can help but sometimes you just want to wear a smooth, bouncy blowout. We get a lot of emails asking how to eliminate the puff. Here’s what works best.

  1. Blow your hair out as usual. Use a good serum to help you control your frizz.
  2. Once you’re done blowing your hair out split it into two sections. Twist both sections BACK (away from your face) starting up near your temples. Don’t laugh– tuck one side into your bra strap while you do the other side.
  3. Join the two sections together under your chin using a rubber band as you see in photo 3.
  4. Go apply your makeup and get dressed. I know you may look like a little wierdo, but WHO CARES! We’re fighting frizz!
  5. Once you’re dressed and ready to roll, take the rubber band out and put a drop or two of your favorite serum. We love THIS ONE and used it for this tutorial!
  6. Put a little serum where you need it and you’re good to go!

Have you ever tried this??

FLORAL WATER SPRAY

photos/post/design: Kristin Ess

What’s the best thing about Spring? Flowers, obviously! Especially the ones that can be bottled up and sprayed all over. Today were going to show you how to make your own floral water.

You will need: A large metal pot with glass dome lid, a ceramic ramekin, flowers, cutting board, knife, bottled water, turkey baster, ice.

  1. In the center of your large pot, place ceramic ramekin as your “catch bowl”. This is where the floral water will fall. Some people use bricks below their catch bowl but I’ve always thought that makes my water smell a little dirty. Instead I use a ceramic ramekin that can withstand higher heat. I’ve never had a problem with the ramekin getting too hot and “cooking” the fragrance. But if you want to put a brick under as a buffer, go for it!
  2. Pull the petals off of your flowers and give them a little chop. Not too much– I just do it to help release the fragrance.
  3. Pile the flowers around the ceramic ramekin as you see in photo 3. Add 1 1/2 cups of water for each cup of flowers. Note: Depending on where you live, I suggest using bottled water. If there’s any unwanted bacteria in your tap water, you certainly don’t want to bottle it up. Could get gross, fast!
  4. Place your glass lid upside down on the pot. Add a tray of ice on top. Without going into too much detail- the cold temperature of the ice will help procure condensation underneath the lid.
  5. Place it on the stovetop on low. I used a turkey baster to clear away the ice as it melted. Watch your flowers– once the color is gone from the petals, lift the lid. You should end up with a small amount of clear liquid inside  your ramekin.
  6. Use a turkey baster to transfer the floral water into a bottle. You may have to repeat the process to get an entire bottle full. Tighten the lid and spray away!!  

Here’s my hilarious little illustration of how the process works. Uh– don’t judge.

My favorite flowers to use:

  • Rose (particularly Sterling Silver if you can find them)
  • Jasmine
  • Chamomile (any tea for that matter)
  • Lemon Thyme
  • Lavender
  • Orange blossom
  • Honeysuckle
  • Champaka
  • Sage
  • Verbena
  • Coconut
  • Peony
  • Frangipani

Sadly I haven’t been able to make gardenias work for this yet, but luckily all of the ones above have worked really well.